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Topic: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

  1. Brochure, Fact Sheet: IBS Questions and Answers

    101

    By: Douglas A. Drossman, MD

    This in-depth overview of IBS includes information on symptoms, causes, diagnosis, management, and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Written in collaboration by IFFGD and physicians noted for their knowledge about IBS. Newly revised and updated 2013.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  2. Fact Sheet: The Neurobiology of Stress and Emotions

    106

    By: Emeran A. Mayer, MD

    We often hear the term “stress” associated with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients experience a worsening of symptoms during times of severely stressful life events. But what is stress? How often does it occur? How does our body respond to stress? This article explores the mechanisms that link stress and emotions to responses that have evolved to ensure survival and that, in the modern world, affect health – including gastrointestinal function.

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  3. Fact Sheet: Are You a Gut Responder? Hints on Coping with an Irritable Bowel

    108

    By: Barry Blackwell, MD

    The gut and the brain develop from the same part of the human embryo. So it is not surprising that the intestinal tract has such a rich nerve supply that it is sometimes referred to as “the little brain.” The gut shares many of the same kinds of nerve endings and chemical transmitters as the brain to which it remains linked through a large nucleus (the locus ceruleus). This collection of nerve cells is partly responsible for controlling anxiety and fear, which explains why these emotions can sometimes be associated with bowel function.

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  4. Fact Sheet: ¿Respondes con el intestino?

    108-S

    By: Barry Blackwell, MD

    El intestino y el cerebro se desarrollan en la misma parte del embrión humano. Por lo tanto, no es de sorprenderse que el tracto gastrointestinal cuenta con un suministro muy rico de terminaciones nerviosas por lo que en ocasiones se le conoce como "el pequeño cerebro".

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  5. Fact Sheet: Biofeedback & Bowel Disorders: Teaching Yourself to Live without the Problem

    112

    By: Mary K. Plummer, OTR, BCIA-PMBD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Biofeedback is a neuromuscular reeducation tool we can use to tell if certain processes in our bodies are working correctly. It is a painless process that uses a computer and a video monitor to display bodily functions that we usually are not aware of. Special sensors measure these functions, which are displayed as sounds we can hear, or as linegraphs we can see on a computer screen. A therapist helps us use this displayed information to modify or change abnormal responses to more normal patterns such as increasing a response, decreasing a response, or learning to coordinate two responses more effectively.

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  6. Fact Sheet: Gut Motility: In Health and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    121

    By: John E. Kellow, MD

    What are normal movements (motility) of the digestive tract? How may altered motility lead to symptoms? Disorders affecting the motility of the digestive tract may be self-limiting, occurring only for a brief period as in acute infection of the digestive tract causing diarrhea. They can also be more longstanding and persistent as in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is associated with a variety of symptoms, particularly abdominal pain and an irregular bowel habit.

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  7. Fact Sheet: Gynecological Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    123

    By: Margaret M. Heitkemper, RN, PhD; Monica Jarett

    Over a decade ago, investigators noted that approximately half of the women attending a gynecology clinic had symptoms (e.g., abdominal pain, change in bowel pattern) compatible with a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Since that study, a number of other studies have demonstrated a higher prevalence of gynecologic disorders, such as pain associated with menstruation (dysmenorrhea) and premenstrual distress syndrome in women with IBS as compared to those without IBS.

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  8. Fact Sheet: Irritable Bowel Syndrome: The Pathophysiologic Links to More Effective Future Therapy

    124

    By: Michael Camilleri, MD

    Several investigators as well as an NIH consensus conference on the "irritable bowel syndrome" (IBS) have stressed the importance of the biopsychosocial model in the etiopathogenesis (origin and development) of this syndrome. In this short article, the pathophysiologic (disease process) links between big brain, little brain, motility and sensation are explored based on currently available data. These data suggest that investigators and clinicians need to be dissuaded from approaching IBS as though it was a single disorder in all patients, or as though only one mechanism is responsible for development of symptoms. In essence, this is a plea for the importance of integrated rather than reductionist approaches to research, diagnosis, and management of IBS. Revised and updated 2009.

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  9. Fact Sheet: Visceral Sensations and Brain-Gut Mechanisms

    127

    By: Emeran A. Mayer, MD

    Over the past several years, different mechanisms located within the gut, or gut wall have been implicated as possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the characteristic IBS symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort. The list ranges from altered transit of intestinal gas, alterations in the colonic flora, immune cell activation in the gut mucosa, and alterations in serotonin containing enterochromaffin cells lining the gut. For those investigators with a good memory, these novel mechanisms can be added to an older list of proposed pathomechanisms, including altered gut motility ("spastic colitis") and alterations in mucus secretion.

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  10. Fact Sheet: What you can do after. (Anal discomfort and how to deal with it)

    137

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    Symptoms related to this sensitive area can be very troubling, yet many people are reluctant to discuss them. Itching (pruritis ani), painful defecation, stained underwear, spotting of blood, and offensive odor add up to embarrassment, distress, social handicap and anguish. These complaints of anal discomfort are very common. Symptoms may coexist with the irritable bowel syndrome or other functional bowel disease. Diarrhea and constipation may aggravate them. Anal symptoms are not part of these conditions as they may occur independently. They may be due to or associated with many local diseases. Whatever the association, perianal irritation can be treated. Find out how to get help and what to do about it. Reviewed and updated 2009.

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  11. Fact Sheet: Understanding and Managing Chronic Pain

    140

    By: Bruce D. Naliboff, PhD

    Most of the time pain serves as a critical part of our sensory system, and is therefore a necessary though unpleasant function of a healthy body. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that chronic pain may be more like a disease or pathology of the nervous system associated with abnormal responses in the brain and spinal cord. Chronic pain has an impact on every facet of patients' lives. If you have chronic pain it is important to develop a pain management plan that works for you.

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  12. Fact Sheet: Diet and Functional Bowel Disease

    143

    By: Kenneth W. Heaton, MD, FRCP

    The exact nature of the connection between what people eat and how their intestines behave is controversial, but there is certainly a connection. The effects of foods on the gut are reviewed.

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  13. Fact Sheet: Central Nervous System Modulation-Its Role in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    146

    By: Paul Enck, PhD

    Most of us have experienced some of the ways that the central nervous system (CNS) affects the gut in our everyday lives. The affect may be direct, like an urgent need to evacuate the bowels when life gets exciting. It may be indirect, like the decision to suppress the urge to go to the bathroom when social circumstances, work, or sanitary conditions do not allow it. In this article, we will examine four methods of brain-gut interaction and their influence on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

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  14. Fact Sheet: Fibromyalgia and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    149

    By: Kevin W. Olden, MD

    Although fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very different disorders, they often overlap, and they share a number of commonalities that bear closer scrutiny. Like irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia is a disorder that is diagnosed based on clinical (symptom based) criteria as opposed to laboratory and imaging studies.

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  15. Fact Sheet: Fiber Therapy in IBS and other GI Disorders

    152

    By: James W. Anderson, MD

    Specific food practices may contribute to constipation, diarrhea, bloating, gas, and abdominal pain. Based on our observation and experiences in nutrition research, we will share with you some suggestions for improving bowel function and decreasing symptom severity.

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  16. Fact Sheet: The Lower GI Tract and its Common Functional Disorders:

    158

    By: David S. Greenbaum

    IBS, Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain, Bloating and Gas, Constipation, Diarrhea

    The term "functional" as used in medicine, generally is taken to mean symptoms not accompanied by demonstrable abnormalities on physical examination, blood tests, x-rays, biopsies, endoscopies or other procedures. An overview of common disorders that affect the colon.

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  17. Fact Sheet: Antidepressants and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    161

    By: Kevin W. Olden, MD

    Antidepressants are commonly prescribed for the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders; they are unique drugs, which have a number of properties that make them particularly useful. In order to fully understand their usefulness in functional gastrointestinal disorders, three areas should be understood: how they work, the brain-gut relationship, and the role of antidepressants in treatment. 

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  18. Fact Sheet: Current Approach to the Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    163

    By: George F. Longstreth, MD

    In the past two decades, medical opinion has changed regarding how to diagnose IBS. The older view emphasized that IBS should be regarded primarily as a "diagnosis of exclusion;" that is, diagnosed only after diagnostic testing excludes many disorders that could possibly cause the symptoms. Fortunately, physicians can now diagnose IBS in most patients by recognizing certain symptom details, performing a physical examination, and undertaking limited diagnostic testing. This simpler approach is grounded on recent knowledge...and it leads to a reliable diagnosis in most cases. Revised and updated 2009.

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  19. Fact Sheet: Using Relaxation in Coping with Gastrointestinal Disorders

    164

    By: Kenneth R. Jones, PhD; Steve Heymen, MS

    Relaxation training is an integral component of behavioral therapies for managing chronic pain, promoting health, and helping patients cope with life-threatening illness. Relaxation can also assist in managing functional GI disorders. How relaxation works and methods are described. Reviewed 2009.

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  20. Fact Sheet: IBS in Men: A Different Disease?

    166

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    The gastrointestinal tract is anatomically gender-neutral. While its furthest extremity is in proximity to the genital organs, surgeons, endoscopists, anatomists, and pathologists observe no differences between the intestines of males and females. It should follow that symptoms and other manifestations of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) should be the same in men as it is in women. This appears not to be so. This article concentrates on gender differences in the epidemiology, symptoms, physiology, psychosocial issues, and responses to treatment of IBS. Reviewed and updated 2009.

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  21. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Current Pharmacologic Treatments of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    168

    By: Anthony J. Lembo, MD

    Pharmacologic treatments for IBS are usually aimed at improving the predominant IBS symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, and abdominal pain. The most common classes of drugs currently used are laxatives, antidiarrheals, antispasmodics, antidepressants, and 5-HT modulators. A review of indications, methods of action, and side effects associated with commonly available agents used to treat IBS.

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  22. Fact Sheet: Hypnosis Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    171

    By: Olafur S. Palsson, PsyD

    The standard medical methods currently used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are of some help to the majority of people with the disorder. However, up to half of IBS sufferers are dissatisfied with the results of standard medical management, and many continue to have frequent symptoms after seeing doctors about them. In recent years, other alternatives have been sought to help these individuals. There has been growing interest in the possibility of using the mind to soothe the symptoms of IBS. This article includes a description of hypnosis for IBS and how to select a hypnotherapist.

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  23. Fact Sheet: Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    178

    By: William C. Orr, PhD

    Sleep complaints are quite common in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, as well as other gastrointestinal disorders including gastroesophageal reflux disease. Estimates of the incidence of sleep complaints in IBS patients range from approximately 30-70%. Lethargy and daytime fatigue, which are common side effects of sleep disturbances, seem to also be common complaints in IBS patients. In fact, there have been several studies which have attempted to relate gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS patients to sleep disturbances and vice versa.

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  24. Fact Sheet: Complementary and Alternative Treatments for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    181

    By: Kirsten Tillisch, MD; Steven Tan, MD, MTOM, LAc

    If conventional medical therapies prove unsuccessful or have unwanted side effects, many people choose to pursue complementary or alternative therapies (CAM). Complementary therapies are done in addition to traditional medical treatments, and alternative therapies are done instead of medical treatments. Many CAM modalities exist and they can be roughly grouped into several categories including herbal/dietary, somatic therapies (such as acupuncture or massage), mind-body therapies (such as hypnosis or meditation), and movement or breathing exercises (such as yoga or tai chi). In this review we will discuss each of these categories, focusing on those that have been studied most rigorously.

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  25. Fact Sheet: Why Symptom Criteria for Functional Gut Disorders?

    182

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    The "functional" gut disorders are syndromes (groups of symptoms) believed to arise from the gastrointestinal tract, but which lack a known cause. The purpose is to update the criteria upon which the diagnoses of functional gut disorders rest.

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  26. Fact Sheet: Pregnancy and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    183

    By: Margaret M. Heitkemper, RN, PhD

    Does pregnancy exacerbate gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in women with functional bowel disorders, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) specifically? This question is relevant for a number of reasons. First, women of reproductive age represent a significant portion of patients with IBS. Second, there is evidence that reproductive cycling (i.e., menstrual cycle) influences symptom reports and bowel transit. This suggests that ovarian hormones, which are elevated in pregnancy, may contribute to GI symptoms. Third, little is known about effective treatment strategies for pregnant women with IBS. This report is intended to address what is known about the potential role of pregnancy in the symptoms of IBS.

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  27. Fact Sheet: Talking to your Doctor About Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    185

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    We encourage you to be proactive in your own health maintenance. Make the most out of your doctor visit-be prepared. Complete the worksheet on the back of this page and take it to your doctor. By providing your physician with this information, he or she may be able to gain a greater insight not ordinarily attainable during a standard 15-minute appointment.

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  28. Fact Sheet: Hypnotherapy for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    186

    By: Peter J. Whorwell, MD

    Unfortunately, the word "hypnosis" often conjures up a whole variety of frequently quite negative connotations even within the medical profession. Many equate the phenomenon with the mind being taken over by the hypnotist and with loss of control by the recipient, which needless to say, is completely erroneous. As a consequence of this, the whole subject is surrounded by a cloud of mystery, which regrettably is often encouraged by those who practice the technique. Reviewed 2009.

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  29. Fact Sheet: Travel Tips Help IBS Sufferers Enjoy Their Vacations

    188

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Travel can be very difficult for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) sufferers, who fear they may not be able to control their symptoms when away from home. If you are one of these persons, here are some travel tips from IFFGD designed to help you avoid and manage symptoms, and help create a sense of being more in control when traveling.

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  30. Fact Sheet: Your Digestive System and How It Works

    190

    By: Information Adapted from the National Diseases Information Clearinghouse NIH

    The digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. A description of why digestion is important, how food is digested, how food moves through the digestive system, nutrients, and how the process is controlled. Revised and updated 2009.

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  31. Fact Sheet: Coping with IBS from the Inside Out: Relaxation Techniques to Manage Symptoms

    191

    By: Debbie Zeichner, LCSW, BCD

    Dealing with a chronic gastrointestinal disorder such as IBS can be distressing. You may have days where you don't want to leave the house. You may feel you are sensitive to certain foods and/or have made significant restrictions to your diet. You may feel abdominal cramping one minute and bloating the next. You may walk into a room and check to see where the nearest restroom is, and may even avoid social situations more than you would like. Your bowel symptoms may feel unpredictable and you wish there was something more you could do to regain a sense of control of your life.

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  32. Fact Sheet: Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Does It Cause Other Disease?

    193

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    There are many discussions of the plausible causes of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the question of whether IBS causes other diseases receives less attention. Reviewed 2009.

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  33. Fact Sheet: Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unrecognized Severity

    194

    By: Peter J. Whorwell, MD

    Unfortunately, irritable bowel is still regarded by both the medical profession and the unaffected population at large, as more of a nuisance than anything particularly serious. In addition, it is frequently dismissed as a purely psychological condition that should not be taken too seriously, especially as it is not life threatening. As a result of this rather negative perception, patients often feel stigmatized, trivialized, and isolated. A discussion of why individuals with IBS deserve more support from the medical community as well as improved therapeutic options. Reviewed 2009.

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  34. Fact Sheet: Is it IBS or Something Else?

    195

    By: George F. Longstreth, MD

    Physicians can usually identify irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) from patients' symptoms. Many patients additionally require only routine blood tests and a colon evaluation, and some require no tests at all to secure the diagnosis. However, some patients worry that they could have another cause for their symptoms, especially when symptoms are severe and chronic, or they know other people who they think had similar symptoms but a different disorder. Occasionally, another medical problem mimics IBS symptoms. This discussion focuses on how IBS is diagnosed and distinguished from other disorders. Reviewed and updated 2009.

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  35. Fact Sheet: A Guide to Managing the Benefits and Risks of Medicines

    202

    By: Information Adapted from FDA Publication FDA

    For many people, taking medication is a regular part of the daily routine, and these medicines are relied upon to treat disease and improve health. Although medicines can make you feel better and help you get well, it's important to know that all medicines, both prescription and over-the-counter, have risks as well as benefits.

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  36. Fact Sheet: Understanding the Quality of Life Impact of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    205

    By: Brennan M. R. Spiegel, MD

    Functional gastrointestinal (G) disorders significantly impact health related quality of life. This impact is obvious to anyone who has a disorder, or to any provider who cares for people with these disorders. In light of this finding, several medical organizations suggest that healthcare providers carefully monitor the health related quality of life of their patients in order to help guide treatment decisions. However, some studies indicate that many (but by no means all) providers do a poor job of addressing their patients' concerns, and accurately assessing the impact of functional GI disorder symptoms on their overall health status. Patients, in turn, become dissatisfied with their care. This article aims to help both provider and patient understand health related quality of life and improve patient care.

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  37. Fact Sheet: Is the Association of IBS with Fibromyalgia and Other Non-gastrointestinal Functional Disorders Important and Why?

    207

    By: Ami D. Sperber, MD

    Patients usually go to doctors with symptoms, not with the names of diseases or conditions. The doctor's task is to make sense of the patient's complaints within the framework of medical diagnoses and recognized diseases. But many patients have symptoms that remain unexplained after the diagnostic process is exhausted. This is the case because modern medicine focuses on diseases that have a basis in the structure or anatomy of the body systems rather than functional disorders that have a basis in how the systems work. In effect, symptoms remain "unexplained" not because they cannot be explained but because some doctors do not know how to explain them. Revised and updated 2009.

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  38. Fact Sheet: Gut Bacteria and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    209

    By: Eamonn M. M. Quigley, MD

    Does bacteria play a role in IBS? If so, is it helpful or harmful? What about antibiotics, or probiotics? Bacteria are present in the normal gut (intestines) and in large numbers the lower parts of the intestine. These "normal" bacteria have important functions in life. A variety of factors may disturb the mutually beneficial relationship between the gut bacteria and its host – and disease may result. The possibility that gut bacteria could have a role in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may surprise some; there is indeed, now quite substantial evidence to support the idea that disturbances in the bacteria that populate the intestine may have a role in at least some patients with IBS. This article looks at recent findings about possible influences of bacteria in IBS, which may be either negative or positive, and at various treatment approaches.

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  39. Fact Sheet: Post-infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Sub-Type of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    210

    By: Robin Spiller, MD

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Within this large group of people, there is a small subgroup whose symptoms begin suddenly. It happens after what appears to be a bout of infection in the GI tract (gastroenteritis). How often do persons who suffer bacterial gastroenteritis develop IBS? Who gets post-infectious IBS and what causes the disorder? How is it treated? A review of the topic is presented.

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  40. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Stress and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unraveling the Code

    211

    By: Yvette Tache, PhD

    Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner – Some common medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), fibromyalgia, and migraine headaches may be stress-related. Understanding of the mind and body's responses called upon during stress may provide insight on the underlying cause of IBS and open the door to new and more effective treatment. "Stress" is a term doctors use to describe normal responses in the body that are needed for health and survival. Our bodies regularly respond to the constant flow of changes that happen around and within us. CRF is the brain's "stress hormone." When stimulated, it interacts with many systems within the body. These interactions include those between the brain and the digestive tract. They effect whether or not we feel discomfort or pain, and the way our bowels move. In some people, the stress response is overactive. When the stress response is out of balance, unwanted symptoms can result.

     

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  41. Fact Sheet: What Patients Know About Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and What They Would Like to Know

    212

    By: Albena Halpert, MD

    The right information can help patients with IBS feel better. Knowing this can help doctors and patients. Wrong beliefs about IBS may lead to distress, more doctor visits, and unneeded tests. For example, patients need to know that IBS: Does not put them at risk for cancer; Does not get worse with age, and; Does not shorten life spans. Patients most often want to know: If foods and diet have an effect on IBS; The causes of IBS, and; How best to treat and cope with the disorder.

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  42. Fact Sheet: Relationships and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    213

    By: Mary-Joan Gerson, PhD; Charles D. Gerson, MD

    Beliefs and experiences play a part in how well persons with an illness, like IBS, feel. How family members relate with each other is another factor that can have an effect on illness. Knowing what these factors are and how to deal with them can help patients and family members cope and feel better.

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  43. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Understanding Intestinal Gas

    214

    By: Fernando Azpiroz, MD, PhD

    Everybody has gas in his or her digestive tract (the esophagus, stomach, small intestine/bowel, and large intestine/bowel). What is happening that causes painful or uncomfortable symptoms associated with gas in some persons while not in others? Report from this 2005 IFFGD Research Award Winner.

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  44. Fact Sheet: Nocebo Effects: They can Impair Health Care

    215

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    The placebo effect can enhance therapy, and promote a successful relationship between healer and patient. However, a treatment administered by a healer may also have a bad effect. Any treatment may have a predictable risk, but a nocebo effect denotes worsening beyond the known risk – the adverse effect of a failed therapeutic relationship. This can result in sub-optimal health care. An examination of its causes and ways to avoid it are discussed.

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  45. Fact Sheet: Getting the Most Out of Your Medications

    216

    By: Information Adapted from FDA Publication FDA

    All medications, prescription and over-the-counter (OTC), have benefits as well as risks associated with their use. The risks may include side effects, allergic reactions, and interactions with foods, drinks, or other drugs. You can increase the potential benefits and reduce potential risks by taking medications properly. It is estimated that up to half of all people who use medications do not use them as prescribed.

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  46. Fact Sheet: Medical Procedure Costs and Surgical Rates in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    217

    By: Alexandru Gaman, MD; Braden Kuo, MD

    Studies show that surgical rates in IBS patients are increased, even though there is no evidence the procedures are beneficial. Surgery is not a treatment for IBS. Yet IBS patients are exposed to more surgical procedures than the general population: the risk is 2–3 times higher for an IBS patient to have gallbladder surgery, appendectomy or hysterectomy; and 10 times higher for colon surgery. The lack of globally effective treatments and clear explanation of the symptoms in IBS contributes to increased utilization of diagnostic testing and predisposes the IBS patients to unnecessary surgical procedures. This fact sheet provides an overview of surgeries and risks in IBS patients.

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  47. Fact Sheet: How to Prepare for Tests

    219

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    In many cases, doctors can make a diagnosis of a functional gastrointestinal disorder after a careful history and examination. Often, however, there is a structural disease that must be excluded by tests that probe the gastrointestinal tract. This fact sheet reviews preparation for common tests, including sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

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  48. Fact Sheet: Dietary Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    220

    By: Peter J. Whorwell, MD

    Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) comment that their symptoms appear to deteriorate following a meal. In many individuals this is merely a nuisance but in others it can be much more of a problem. Fortunately, it is usually reasonably easy to tackle the dietary aspects of IBS as long as you understand a few basic principles. For those who suspect food is a factor in their symptoms, there are 4 foods that most often seem to be involved.

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  49. Fact Sheet: The Medical History: How to Help Your Doctor Help You

    221

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    The most important interaction between patient and doctor is the medical history. Through listening to the story of the patient’s illness and asking relevant questions, a physician may often make a diagnosis, or at least begin to understand the nature and location of the complaint. A few easy steps can help make this process more efficient leading to prompt, more precise diagnosis and treatment. Revised January 2012.

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  50. Fact Sheet: Sex Differences in Abdominal Pain

    223

    By: Elie D. Al-Chaer, MS, PhD, JD

    Experimental and clinical studies highlight the existence of sex-related differences in the perception of and responsiveness to painful stimuli. Sex-related differences in pain processing and responsiveness in general have been documented in experimental studies using animal models, and pain is experienced differently by men and women.  Sex-related differences have also emerged in the search for new IBS-specific medications.

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  51. Fact Sheet: Irritable Bowel Syndrome and a Healthy Holiday Season

    224

    By: Barbara Bradley Bolen, PhD

    Everyday, ordinary life is challenging enough if you suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Add the obligations, deadlines, family dynamics, food focus, and travel issues that are associated with the holiday season, and it can be easy to feel anxious and overwhelmed. This busy time can also be one of great joy, as you get to experience the security of tradition, the warmth of being with loved ones, and the time to reconnect with spiritual roots. In order to achieve a healthy balance, self care becomes essential.

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  52. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Role of the Central Immune System in Functional Disorders

    225

    By: Sylvie Bradesi, PhD

    A new concept of activation of immune cells within the central nervous system (CNS), including the brain and the spinal cord, has been proposed as a major factor contributing to the generation and maintenance of chronic pain.

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  53. Fact Sheet: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Heartburn, Dyspepsia: What’s the Difference?

    226

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    The anatomical diseases Crohn’s, peptic ulcer, and esophagitis have functional counterparts with some similar symptoms; irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), dyspepsia, and functional heartburn, but these cannot be identified by x-ray or gastroscopy. Thus, for the diagnosis of these functional disorders doctors must rely entirely upon the patient’s description of his or her symptoms.

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  54. Fact Sheet: Irritable Bowel Syndrome: An Approach to Treating Patients

    227

    By: Peter J. Whorwell, MD

    At the 7th International Symposium on Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, held in April 2007 by IFFGD, we talked to Peter Whorwell, MD about treatment options that are available to patients with IBS.  For over two decades, Dr. Whorwell has been studying functional gastrointestinal disorders. He directs the South Manchester Functional Bowel Service where he cares for a large number of patients including about 1,000 new patients with IBS per year.

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  55. Fact Sheet: Is There a Health Benefit From High Colonics?

    228

    By: Thomas Puetz, MD

    Is there a health benefit from high colonics? Are there risks? This article will help you understand how the bowels function and whether or not there is a role for high colonics.

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  56. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Searching for Underlying Causes

    229

    By: Magnus Simren, MD, PhD

    Dr. Simrén is a 2007 IFFGD Research Award recipient. His main research areas are the causes and development of functional GI disorders. In this article, Dr. Simrén discusses his research into the role of food and nutrients for gut function in IBS, and the link between different alterations of function and the symptom pattern of the patient.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  57. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Symptom Based Psychology for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    230

    By: Bruce D. Naliboff, PhD

    How do we understand the many studies that show an increase in negative moods like anxiety or depression in those suffering from functional gastrointestinal (GI) and pain conditions? Are these psychological factors an important cause for the development and/or maintenance of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and other functional GI disorders? Or are they a result of maybe years of disrupted life activities and frequent periods of intolerable symptoms? 

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  58. Fact Sheet: How Can I Determine if I Received a Thorough Colonoscopy?

    232

    By: Thomas Puetz, MD

    Colonoscopy is currently our most effective means of reducing the incidence of colon cancer, but only slightly over one-third of eligible persons elect to have a colonoscopy. With the inconvenience and expense of colonoscopy incurred, one should expect and receive a thorough examination. This article outlines some way to ensure that your colonoscopy is performed correctly and thoroughly.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  59. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Diagnostic Testing in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Theory vs. Reality

    233

    By: Brennan M. R. Spiegel, MD

    Dr. Spiegel is a recipient of a 2007 IFFGD Research Award. In this article, Dr. Spiegel discusses some of the challenges in diagnosing IBS, including whether or not to perform multiple diagnostic tests.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  60. Fact Sheet: Is Constipation and Bloating Related to Menstrual Periods?

    239

    By: Peter J. Whorwell, MD

    This Clinical Corner article discusses how constipation and bloating are affected by menstruation, especially in women with IBS, and offers some tips for controlling the bowel symptoms and the pain.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  61. Fact Sheet: Serotonin: What is it Doing in My Gastrointestinal Tract?

    243

    By: Gary Mawe, PhD; Jill Hoffman, PhD Candidate

    This article explains the role of serotonin in the gut and how this may be used to develop new treatments for the functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  62. Fact Sheet: Could Probiotics Help Alleviate your Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms?

    246

    By: Nancy DeMaria; Danielle Maier, PA-C; Yehuda Ringel, MD

    There is evidence that a normal bacteria composition of the intestinal microbiota play an important role in the development and normal functioning of the intestinal tract. Recently researchers have been studying the role of normal intestinal bacteria (also called intestinal microbiota) in maintaining healthy and normal GI function.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  63. Fact Sheet: Changes You Should Not Ignore if You Have IBS

    247

    By: W. Grant Thompson, MD, FRCPC

    An "alarm" symptom, sometimes also called a "red flag," simply means a symptom not explained by IBS, which calls for additional investigation. Dr. Thompson discusses the development of alarm symptoms and how to know when to see your doctor about them.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  64. Fact Sheet: Dietary Triggers for IBS Symptoms: The Low FODMAP Diet Approach

    251

    By: CK Yao; Jessica Biesiekierski, PhD; Sue Shepherd, PhD; Peter Gibson, MD, FRACP

    A wide range of therapies have been used to control IBS symptoms including various medications, bulking agents and laxatives, and a myriad of lifestyle changes. Most individuals with IBS believe that their symptoms are related to the consumption of certain foods, but advice in this area has been conflicting and confusing and offered little relief for IBS sufferers. Our research team has developed a new dietary management approach – the Low FODMAP diet – to control symptoms associated with IBS. In Australia, the low FODMAP diet is increasingly being accepted as the primary management strategy for IBS, recently adopted by their National Therapeutic Guidelines.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  65. Fact Sheet: Progressive GI Symptoms: Could it be Scleroderma?

    254

    By: Dinesh Khanna, MD, MS; Brennan M. R. Spiegel, MD

    On rare occasions, patients thought to have a functional GI disorder can develop progressive GI symptoms from another underlying condition. This is truly rare, but when symptoms do not respond as expected, or if symptoms get worse and worse despite a clinician’s best efforts, it may be worth considering other things. Scleroderma is a very rare disorder that, when present, can frequently affect the gut.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  66. Fact Sheet: What is IBS?

    255

    By: Ami D. Sperber, MD

    IBS is the most common of the functional disorders of the digestive tract. It is characterized by chronic abdominal pain and irregular bowel movements.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  67. Fact Sheet: Questions and Answers about Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    261

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Commonly asked questions and answers about irritable bowel syndrome.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  68. Fact Sheet: Common Questions About Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    263

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    This publication addresses commonly asked questions about irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a group of symptoms that occur over a long-term. In IBS there are problems with the way bowel nerves and muscles work.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  69. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Bowel Incontinence and Aging

    313

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Easy Read Format. Many things happen as we age that makes a loss of bowel control more likely. Illness, injury, changes in bowel habits and other factors affect the ability to stay in control. Loss of bowel control is surprisingly common. It happens to a lot of people. There are a number of ways to be helped. This pamphlet will help you understand what is wrong and what you can do about it.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    This publication is also available in Spanish. Go»

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  70. Fact Sheet: Incontinencia Fecal y la Edad

    313-S

    By: William F. Norton, Communications Director, IFFGD; Jeanette Tries, PhD, OTR

    Con la edad ocurren muchos cambios y la pérdida de la continencia fecal se vuelve más probable. Las enfermedades orgánicas, los cambios del hábito intestinal y otros factores, afectan la habilidad de mantener el control. La pérdida de la continencia fecal es muy común. Le ocurre a mucha gente. Existen muchas formas de encontrar ayuda para este problema. Este folleto le ayudará a comprender que es lo que ocurre y qué puede hacer para mejorarlo.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  71. Fact Sheet: Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Chronic Pelvic Pain and the Overlap of Chronic Pelvic Pain Disorders

    315

    By: Michael Pezzone, MD, PhD

    Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner – Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is the key element comprising several disorders that are all characterized by intermittent or continuous pain of at least 6 months duration localized to the pelvic area, the lower part of the abdominal cavity. Bowel, lower urinary tract, sexual, and/or gynecologic function are often affected. Chronic pelvic pain disorders affect 15% of both men and women, and include disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); interstitial cystitis (IC); chronic inflammation of the prostate gland; rectal pain that lasts for hours or even days; and vulvodynia. A discussion of "cross-sensitization," whereby acute or chronic irritation of one pelvic organ can lead to abnormal activity, sensitivity, or even inflammation in another, non-irritated organ or structure.

     

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  72. Fact Sheet: Functional Dyspepsia and IBS: Incidence and Characteristics

    515

    By: John E. Kellow, MD; Douglas A. Drossman, MD

    Symptom overlap is common among several functional GI disorders. For instance, care must be taken not to confuse functional dyspepsia with other common disorders that may cause upper gastrointestinal distress, like heartburn, IBS, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional abdominal bloating, and functional biliary disorders. This article compares two common functional GI disorders - functional dyspepsia and IBS.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  73. DHM: Digestive Health Matters Vol 21 Issue 1 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    664

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    In this issue:

    • April is IBS Awareness Month
    • What is IBS?
    • Research News You Can Use
      • FDA Approves New Treatment for GERD
      • FDA Issues PPI Safety Alert
      • Understanding the Disease Process in Gastroparesis
      • Bloating is an Important Symptom in Gastroparesis
      • New Discoveries about Gut Bacteria in Children with IBS
    • Be an Active Member of Your Health Care Team
    • Books of Interest
    • Industry Treatment News
    • Professional Announcements
      • Qualified Investigators Sought for Phase 3 Trial
      • ANMS Postgraduate Course
      • Joint International Neurogastroenterology and Motility Meeting
      • IFFGD Seeking Applications for 2013 Research Awards
      • Save the Date – 10th International Symposium on FGIDs
    • Community News
      • Courageous Story
      • Take Part in Digestive Health Alliance Advocacy Day 2012
      • Budget Cuts Threaten Medical Research
      • Make the Functional GI & Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act Law
      • Raising Awareness – IBS Public Service Announcement
      • You can Help Find Cures for Children
      • Personal Advocacy

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  74. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 20.02 - 2011 No 2 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    668

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 19.03 - Fall 2010 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • Benefit Regatta
    • IFFGD’s 20th Anniversary
    • Introducing the Digestive Health Alliance
    • Research News
      - New NIH Program Addresses Bowel Control
      - New Treatment for Bowel Incontinence
      - New Treatment for C.-diff
      - Report from DDW
      • Gastroparesis
      • IBS
      • Functional GI Disorders
      • CVS
    • The Low FODMAP Diet for IBS
    • Traveling with Gastroparesis
    • Foundation Update
      - 9th International Symposium
      - IFFGD Research Awards
      - Charity Challenge Raises Funds
    • Legislative Update
      - Functional GI and Motility Disorders Research Enhancement Act
    • Community News
      - Member Story
      - Getting the Message Out

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

     

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  75. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 20.01 - 2011 No 1 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    669

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 19.03 - Fall 2010 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • April is IBS Awareness Month
    • IBS Symptom Changes you Should not Ignore
    • Research News
      - Detecting Barrett’s Esophagus
      - Treating Gastroparesis
      - Mind-Body Therapy
      - Treating Constipation
      - C. Difficile Treatment
      - Short Bowel Syndrome Treatment
    • Industry Treatment News
    • Foundation Update
      - Patient Needs Expressed
      - Professional Events
    • Legislative Update
      - Priorities for 2011
      - Register for our 2011 Capitol Hill Advocacy Day
      - DDNC Public Policy Forum
    • Hope Through Research
    • Community News
      - Digestive Health Alliance Benefit Regatta
      - First Annual Walk by the Bay

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

     

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  76. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 19.01 - Spring 2010 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    675

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 19.01 - Spring 2010 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • April is IBS Awareness Month
    • Changes You Should Not Ignore if You Have IBS
    • News You can Us:
      - Not All "Probiotics" are Alike
      - Genetic Factors in IBS?
      - A Changing Environment and the Increasing Prevalence of Celiac Disease
      - Lactose Intolerance and Health
    • Courageous Stories - Aduts and Kids; Functional and Motility Disorders
    • Expressive Writing may be a Promising Treatment for IBS
    • Constipation in Children

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  77. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 18.04 - Winter 2009 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    677

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 18.04 - Winter 2009 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • A Message from IFFGD
    • Probiotics and Functional GI Symptoms
    • GERD and Sleep
    • Complexity of IBS
    • What are Clinical Trials or Studies
    • Take Part in Research
    • IFFGD Industry Council News – New Treatments
    • Clinical Trials Listings
    • Functional Abdominal Pain in Children and Adolescents

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  78. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 18.01 - Spring 2009 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    683

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 18.01 - Spring 2009 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • IBS Awareness Month Poster
    • Research Report from IFFGD - IBS Patients: Their Illness Experience and Unmet Needs
    • Dyssynergic Defecation: a Common Cause of Chronic Constipation
    • Digestive Health Research: Treatment Guideline for IBS
    • Editorial: Treating Functional Constipation in Children
    • Clinical Corner
      - Diet Advice for Barrett’s Esophagus and GERD?
      - When is Endoscopy Recommended for GERD?
    • Soiling Solutions in Children
    • I Have a Gut Problem: Which Doctor Should I See?

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  79. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 17.04 - Winter 2008 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    685

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 17.04 - Winter 2008 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • A Noisy Tummy: What does it mean?
    • Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children and Adolescents
    • Books of Interest
    • Industry Council News
    • Digestive Health Research
      - Treatment Guidelines for IBS
      - Probiotics for GI Conditions
    • Manage Your Medicines
    • Participate in Online Studies on IBS
    • Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner – Diagnostic Testing in IBS: Theory vs. Reality

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  80. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 17.01 - Spring 2008 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    691

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 17.01 - Spring 2008 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • IBS: An Approach to Treating Patients 
    • IBS in Children and Adolescents 
    • IBS, Heartburn, Dyspepsia: What's the Difference? 
    • Treating Functional Dyspepsia: What are Your Options? 
    • Clinical Corner – Answers to Your Questions About Digestive Health 
      - Is nausea a symptom associated with IBS? How is it treated? 
      - Are rice-based foods recommended for people with digestive disorders like IBS?
      - Can a colonoscopy procedure cause changes in bowel habits?
    • Lactose Intolerance: Definition, Symptoms and Treatment
    • Digestive Health Research: Barrett's Esophagus Risk Factors 
    • Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: IBS: Searching for Underlying Causes

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  81. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 16.04 - Winter 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    693

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 16.04 - Winter 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • 2007 Symposium Summary Report
    • Sex Differences in Abdominal Pain
    • Chronic Pain Management Tips
    • Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Abdominal Pain
    • IBS and a Healthy Holiday Season
    • The Clinical Corner
    • Digestive Health Research: A Sampling of Recently Published Studies
    • Report – Digestive Disease Awareness Day proclaimed in Pennsylvania
    • Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Role of the Central Immune System in Functional Disorders

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

     

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  82. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 16.03 - Fall 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    695

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 16.03 - Fall 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • GERD Awareness Week
    • Dietary Aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
    • The Medical History: How to Help Your Doctor Help You
    • The Clinical Corner: Physical activity and diverticulosis; Vitamin B12 and IBS; Antibiotics, probiotics and C. diff
    • Industry Sponsored Clinical Trials
    • Digestive Health Research: A Sampling of Recently Published Studies
    • Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Home Based Guided Imagery to Treat Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain

    Remember, Digestive Health Mattersis FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  83. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 16.02 - Summer 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    697

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 16.02 - Summer 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    In this issue:

    • Procedure Costs and Surgical Rates in IBS patients
    • The Clinical Corner
    • Commentary on Post-infectious IBS study
    • Changes in Bowel Control at Childbirth
    • Recently Published Pediatric Studies
    • Why Does Milk Bother Me?
    • How to Prepare for Tests
    • On Tract: Topics in GI Motility
    • IFFGD Presents 2007 Research Awards
    • Hirschsprung’s Disease Study
    • Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Disorders and Conditions that Disrupt Swallowing

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  84. DHM: Digestive Health Matters 16.01 - Spring 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDF

    699

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Digestive Health Matters 16.01 - Spring 2007 - ELECTRONIC PDFIn this issue:

    • April is IBS Awareness Month
    • What Patients Know and Would Like to Know About IBS
    • Relationships and Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    • Bowel Incontinence and Aging
    • Distal Esophageal Spasm (formerly Diffuse Esophageal Spasm)
    • Clinical Corner
    • Capitol Hill Minute
    • Announcements: Celebrity Support for Digestive Health; IFFGD Research Awards
    • Books of Interest
    • Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants
    • Report from IFFGD Research Award Winner: Understanding Intestinal Gas
    • Profiles from the IFFGD Community

    Remember, Digestive Health Matters is FREE to Members.

     

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  85. Brochure: "IBS Questions and Answers" Publication - Bulk Order Quantity: 100

    BU100

    By: Douglas A. Drossman, MD

    This in-depth overview of IBS includes information on symptoms, causes, diagnosis, management, and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Written in collaboration by IFFGD and physicians noted for their knowledge about IBS. Newly revised and updated 2013.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    Purchase this item to place a bulk order for one-hundred (100) 3.5" x 8.5" glossy color brochures, to be delivered by UPS. Price includes shipping for the continential United States only; exact shipping charges will be calculated for international orders. For delivery to PO Box addresses, international addresses, or payment via purchase order, please call us at 414-964-1799.

    To purchase a single PDF copy of the brochure, click here.

    Non-Member Price: $48.00 Add Item to Cart
  86. Brochure: "IBS Questions and Answers" Publication - Bulk Order Quantity: 50

    BU50

    By: Douglas A. Drossman, MD

    This in-depth overview of IBS includes information on symptoms, causes, diagnosis, management, and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Written in collaboration by IFFGD and physicians noted for their knowledge about IBS. Newly revised and updated 2013.

    Also available offline as a glossy color brochure (3.5" x 8.5"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    Purchase this item to place a bulk order for fifty (50) 3.5" x 8.5" glossy color brochures, to be delivered by UPS. Price includes shipping for the continential United States only; exact shipping charges will be calculated for international orders. For delivery to PO Box addresses, international addresses, or payment via purchase order, please call us at 414-964-1799.

    To purchase a single PDF copy of the brochure, click here.

    Non-Member Price: $38.00 Add Item to Cart
  87. Brochure, Intro Pack: Health Fair Kit

    HFK

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Health Fair Kits provide professionals with a variety of printed materials about GI disorders for use at Health Fairs, Awareness Events, or in your clinic. Choose from Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), or gastroparesis.

    Health Fair Kits are free to IFFGD professional members. Join Now.

    Kits contain:

    • 1 8.5"x11" "Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders" Poster (download free posters here)
    • 5 copies of our Patient Pub List
    • 10 copies of our GERD, IBS, or gastroparesis Brochure
    • 5 copies of our "Talking to your Doctor" Fact Sheet
    • 2 GERD or IBS ad slicks
    • 5 Copies of our magazine, Digestive Health Matters
    • IFFGD Information for Professionals

    Kits on other disorders are also available. Call IFFGD at 414-964-1799 for price and purchasing options.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  88. Brochure, Fact Sheet: The Neurobiology Basis of Mind Body Medicine

    NEU

    By: Emeran A. Mayer, MD

    How do the mind and body interact with each other and the environment . . . and in this process actively maintain health and prevent disease? This accessable publication describes the basis for a growing awareness of an evolving convergence of many "alternative" concepts of health and disease with cutting edge concepts proposed by science. This is information that can be helpful to anyone with a chronic digestive disorder. A summary of a 1998 conference involving internationally recognized scientific leaders, and a group of prominent and unique practitioners of mind-body medicine.

    Also available offline as a 22 page soft-cover color booklet (8.5" x 11"). Contact IFFGD for details.

    Non-Member Price: $3.99 Add Item to Cart
  89. Brochure, Fact Sheet: Personal Daily Diary (Online version)

    PDD

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Use this Personal Daily Diary for 2-4 weeks to help you get the most out of your next doctor visit.

    The objective of using this Daily Diary is to gain a better understanding of your bowel disorder.

    Also available offline for $3.00 as a 32 page soft-cover color booklet (5.5" x 8.5"). Order here or contact IFFGD for details.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  90. RG: Reporter's Guide to IBS

    R-IBS

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    This guide from IFFGD provides in-depth information about IBS, frequently asked questions, glossary of medical terms, IBS resources, bibliography of key IBS articles and books, and suggested story angles and reasons for writing about IBS.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  91. Fact Sheet: IBS in the Real World Survey

    RWS

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Sponsored by IFFGD, this quantitative research study was conducted in 2002 among 350 U.S. adults who reported a diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.  A glimpse into the real world of living with the disease, symptoms, treatment, side effects, and the overall impact that IBS has on lives.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
  92. Fact Sheet: IBS Patients: Their Illness Experience and Unmet Needs

    UNS

    By: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders IFFGD

    Sponsored by IFFGD, in collaboration with the UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, the findings in this comprehensive 2007 online survey show that much more needs to be done to develop and deliver satisfactory treatment to IBS sufferers.

    Non-Member Price: FREE View PDF
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